Full Body Storytime & Ready to Read Webinars

Reach up high and touch the sky...Reach down low and touch your toes!

Best Storytime Practices a webinar series with Jenifer Strauss continues:

  • Full Body Storytime: Moving and Grooving with Stories, Songs, Rhythms and Rhymes
    Tuesday, December 19, 2017, 2pm EST

    Description:
    Movement is a child’s first language! Combine movement with rhythm and you have the foundation for literacy skills like listening, speaking, reading and writing.
    In support of healthy early childhood learning experiences and the ALA Every Child Ready to Read initiative, narrative consultant/storyteller, Jenifer Strauss will host a live webinar featuring stories, songs, play, and movement. Participants will learn how to plan and execute a well-balanced storytime that will allow young patrons to be active and creative with language. Directions for making percussion instruments and props included. PDF handouts of song lyrics and supporting research provided.
    Books:
    I Knew an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (your favorite version)
    The Talkative Tortoise (India, Haiti, Anishinabek origins)
    The Enormous Turnip, a folktale illustrated by Kathy Parkinson (or your favorite retelling)
  • Ready to Read Michigan:  “I Got the Rhythm!”
    Tuesday, January 16th, 2pm EST
    Join us to learn about a Ready to Read Storytime designed for outreach to your local early childhood providers & schools!  This year’s book selection is “I Got the Rhythm” by Connie Schofield-Morrison and illustrated by Frank Morrison.  Copies of the title will be shipped to libraries mid-January-early February, so this is a sneak peek if you do not already have the book in-hand.
 

Library of Michigan Webinars

Upcoming LM Webinars:

These webinars are made possible by grant funds from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) administered by the State of Michigan through the Library of Michigan.

Every Child Ready to Read in Michigan 2 year recap! with Sue McCleaf Nespeca on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at 2:00 PM

Teen Clubs: on Tuesday, November 14th, at 2:00 PM

Want to keep the momentum going after a successful teen event? That “one off” can easily be turned into a popular monthly club that will keep young adults coming back. "Club Programs for Teens: 100 Activities for the Entire Year" authors Amy Alessio and Heather Booth will tell you how.  Presenters are Heather Booth, co-editor of "The Whole Library Handbook: Teen Services," and Amy Alessio, co-author of the bestsellers "A Year of Programs for Teens" and "A Year of Programs for Teens 2."

 

Full Body Storytime: Moving and Grooving with Stories, Songs, Rhythms and Rhymes
Tuesday, December 19, 2017, 2pm

Description:
Movement is a child’s first language! Combine movement with rhythm and you have the foundation for literacy skills like listening, speaking, reading and writing.
In support of healthy early childhood learning experiences and the ALA Every Child Ready to Read initiative, narrative consultant/storyteller, Jenifer Strauss will host a live webinar featuring stories, songs, play, and movement. Participants will learn how to plan and execute a well-balanced storytime that will allow young patrons to be active and creative with language. Directions for making percussion instruments and props included. PDF handouts of song lyrics and supporting research provided.
Books:
I Knew an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (your favorite version)
The Talkative Tortoise (India, Haiti, Anishinabek origins)
The Enormous Turnip, a folktale illustrated by Kathy Parkinson (or your favorite retelling)

Ready to Read Michigan:  “I Got the Rhythm!”
Tuesday, January 16th, 2pm
Join us to learn about a Ready to Read Storytime designed for outreach to your local early childhood providers & schools!  This year’s book selection is “I Got the Rhythm” by Connie Schofield-Morrison and illustrated by Frank Morrison.  Copies of the title will be shipped to libraries mid-January-early February, so this is a sneak peek if you do not already have the book in-hand.

LM’s New & Advanced Director’s Workshops registration

Registration is open for the Library of Michigan’s New & Advanced Director Workshops.

All new (or new to Michigan) public library directors must attend the New Director Workshop within 12 months of appointment.  If your new library is a Class 4 or higher, attendance at the Advanced Director workshop is required within 24 months of appointment.

To register, please visit: https://www.solutionwhere.com/WW/lom/Default.aspx.

For more information on the certification process, visit: www.michigan.gov/librarycertification.

LM’s New & Advanced Director Workshops 2017

Library of Michigan’s New & Advanced Director Workshops

Registration is open for the Library of Michigan’s New & Advanced Director Workshops.  All new (or new to Michigan) public library directors must attend the New Director Workshop within 12 months of appointment.   If your new library is a Class 4 or higher, attendance at the Advanced Director workshop is required within 24 months of appointment.

To register, please visit: https://www.solutionwhere.com/WW/lom/Default.aspx.

For more information on the certification process, visit: www.michigan.gov/librarycertification.

New WebJunction Content and Upcoming Webinars

 Check out these upcoming webinars and new content from WebJunction. Free access to WebJunction is brought to you, in part, by the Library of Michigan.

Highlighted content:

These resources can help you strengthen your library and services to the community, explore them today!

  • Free Activity Calendars Put Programming at Your Fingertips: Library users young and old benefit from the fun, exciting, and educational programming you offer in your schools and libraries. But little do they know how much hard work and planning goes into putting those activities together! Check out these free, downloadable resources.
  • Librarians who Wikipedia: This series highlights public library staff who are using Wikipedia. Wikipedia + Libraries: Better Together is a WebJunction project that bridges public library staff and Wikipedia. A popular and convenient reference source, Wikipedia is the sixth-most visited website online. What can Wikipedia do for public libraries? We’ve recently launched a new series of articles called Librarians Who Wikipedia. We speak with public library staff who have meaningfully engaged with Wikipedia to hear what it has brought to them and their message for other public library staff.

Free WebJunction webinars for you!

These upcoming webinars are open for registration. If you can’t attend a live session, all WebJunction webinars are recorded and available for free in the Course Catalog.

Measures that Matter Part Two: Detailing the Data-based Story of Public Libraries

Tuesday, June 13, 2017 ♦ 3:00 pm Eastern / 12:00 pm Pacific ♦ 1 hour

Registration: http://www.webjunction.org/events/webjunction/measures-that-matter-2.html

In the United States, there are a number of national surveys of public libraries and their patrons. While all of these efforts help us tell a data-based story of public libraries, they differ in terms of their samples, what types of data they collect, and how their data are collected, stored, and accessed. During the first webinar in this three-part series, we scanned the landscape of major public library surveys and considered how library data could be used more productively in the future. In this second webinar, we will drill deeper into the concepts of sampling, data types, and data management, and how they impact what we know about public libraries and their patrons. At the end of this webinar, participants will have a greater understanding of various sampling methods, recognize the differences between inputs, outputs, and outcomes, and be aware of the data management practices for various national public library surveys.

This webinar is the second in a three-part series about the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ and the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies’ Measures that Matter initiative, a field-wide discussion of the current state of public library data. All sessions are recorded for you to watch if you aren’t able to participate live.

Presented by: Rebecca Teasdale, Senior Evaluation and Research Associate, Garibay Group; John Bertot, Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs and Professor, College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland; Linda Hofschire, Director, Library Research Service, Colorado State Library


Effective Online Outreach: Tools and Tactics for Connecting Communities and Collections

Thursday, June 29, 2017 ♦ 3:00 pm Eastern / 12:00 pm Pacific ♦ 1 hour

Registration: http://www.webjunction.org/events/webjunction/effective-online-outreach.html

 How did a small two-person library capture national media attention, become a focus of high-profile museum exhibits, and generate 13 million views of its online photos in just a few years? They built on a framework of eight values to drive innovative services and greatly enhance the information-seeking experience of their users. With a combination of free and low-cost web tools, savvy marketing, and innovations borrowed from archives and museums, Kenn Bicknell embarked on an aggressive digitization and outreach program to push information out to his constituents in creative, engaging ways. Find inspiration and practical ideas that can breathe new life into your collections and keep libraries front and center in users' lives.

Presented by: Kenn Bicknell, Digital Resources Librarian, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Library and Archive

LSTA Summer quick grant program

The Library of Michigan announced a new Library Services & Technology Act (LSTA) summer quick grant program for public libraries . LSTA allows grant funds for public library services and has priorities for targeting library services to individuals of diverse geographic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds, to individuals with disabilities, individuals with limited functional literacy or information skills and expanding services for learning and access to information.

This program provides funding for public libraries to purchase materials and supplies that meet the selected program topics for a given year and are for an identified program or service the library will be providing. Funding is intended to supplement local topical services that improve information access and quality of service in their communities. The focus will be on small projects that improve community services, with a focus on the LSTA priorities listed above.

The grant period will be from June to August annually, as funding allows. Funding will be from $500 to $2,000. Funding is by reimbursement. The application deadline is May 22, 2017.

Eligible applicants are Michigan public libraries that are legally established and currently eligible for state aid. Detailed information on the grant program, including the program timeline, applicant eligibility, and the application, is available at www.michigan.gov/lsta.  Please contact Karren Reish at 517-241-0021 or reishk@michigan.gov with questions on the program.

 

2017 Beginning Workshop

May 17-19, 2017 at Shanty Creek Resort
Bellaire, MI

This event is geared for library staff members that have not had the opportunity for formal library coursework and have little experience working in libraries. Its aim is to introduce staff to a variety of topics and offer them practical skills that they can use in their organization. Anyone new to the profession or just hired at a library, no matter what their academic credentials, is welcome but please be aware that the content is geared towards those with limited library experience.

For details on the agenda and lodging reservations visit: http://www.michigan.gov/beginningworkshop

#MiLibSnap

#MiLibSnap

The Library of Michigan's announced the second all-state library advocacy campaign which is taking place May 22-26, 2017 with the hashtag #MiLibSnap.

You can use it in all your social media venues.

This is a national initiative of library advocacy based on data. This year's campaign has a slight twist. It's still about advocacy and it's still about data but your are encouraged to take library numbers and compare them to figures of other activities in your community.

Does your community plant a lot of flowers or trees? Drink (or make) a lot of beer or wine? Attend a lot of sporting events? Gather numbers for how many and compare them to library data such as door counts or program attendance or circulation that show your library is engaged with your community. Need numbers? Try State of Michigan websites, your local chamber of commerce, local research agencies such as colleges or universities. Get creative!

Here are a couple of examples, feel free to borrow them:

NBA #MiLibSnap 2017 NFL Michiganders checked out 1.5 times more materials than the total number of NBA, NFL & NHL ticket sales in North America.

#MiLibSnap 2017 In Ingham County last year, enough people attended library programs to more than fill the 75K seat Spartan Stadium.

Consider using action verbs in your posts such as: Serve, Answer, Engage, Link, Entertain, Teach, and Create. As you ready your comparisons, think about the distinct value that you provide better than anyone else in your community.

Consider how your library is:

  • An excellent return on investment
  • Supports strong economic development and impact
  • Provides great employment support
  • Delivers provable early literacy development
  • Serves your community with ongoing lifelong support for formal education and homework help
  • Provides affordable access to community resources
  • Serves the whole community equitably
  • Supports cultural vitality
  • Is a recognized and valued leisure activities for a majority of Michiganders

There are lots of free tools to help you with the graphics, from simple to sophisticated. Check out the list below for creating great visuals.

Word cloud tools:

  • Wordle -- http://www.wordle.net
  • Tagul -- https://tagul.com/
  • Word It Out -- https://worditout.com/
  • PowerPoint add-in

Infographic tools:

  • Piktochart -- http://piktochart.com/ 
  • Venngage -- https://venngage.com/
  • Easel.ly -- http://www.easel.ly/

Data visualization tools:

  • Gapminder -- http://www.gapminder.org/
  • Tableau -- https://public.tableau.com/s/
  • Google Public Data -- http://www.google.com/publicdata/directory
  • Infogr.am -- https://infogr.am/app/#/create