A Chat with Children’s Author Dan Gutman

 
 

Dan Gutman

Children’s Author

Join us for a chat with Dan Gutman, author of My Weird School series and The Genius Files. In total, he has written 165 books. Dan will share with us how he started on his author journey, tips he shares with kids about their own writing, and why being persistent is so important in writing.

Dan’s website www.dangutman.com
Facebook page www.facebook.com/pages/Dan-Gutman/60020139122?ref=ts

Dan was born in New York City and grew up in New Jersey where he graduated from Rutgers University with a degree in psychology. After spending a few unhappy years in graduate school, he decided that psychology was not for him and what he really wanted to do was to be a writer.  This revelation led him to New York where he began writing humorous essays.  He also wrote magazine articles and a few screenplays.  

In 1982, Dan started a video games magazine called Video Games Player.  A few years later the magazine went out of business, and he decided to take a gamble and become a full-time freelance writer. At first he wrote about computers, but gradually started tackling other topics.   Eventually his writing appeared in Esquire, Newsweek, Science Digest, Writer’s Digest, USA Today, and the Village Voice.  He was gaining confidence as a writer, but still hadn’t found the type of writing he really wanted to do.

In 1987, Dan decided to try writing about sports. This led to an article in Discover magazine and then to his first adult baseball book (“It Ain’t Cheatin’ If You Don’t Get Caught”). It sold pretty well, and he wrote several more books for adults. None of them were big sellers, but it was a lot more fun than writing about computers.

In 1992, when his son was two years old, he decided to try writing for children.  Dan wrote a few non-fiction baseball books, then branched out to other sports.  In 1994, I decided to give fiction a try. He sold the first novel he wrote (“They Came From Centerfield”), and after fifteen years, Dan figured out what his career should be – writing fiction for kids. For the first time, he felt he was doing something he was good at, something that was fun, creatively rewarding, and appreciated by an audience.

“I want reading my books to feel effortless. I’m trying to write stories that are so captivating that kids will look up after an hour and feel like they’d been watching a movie in their head.” –Dan Gutman

This Zoom session is planned to last 1 hour.  You will be sent the Zoom link in the registration confirmation.

Virtual Author Series with Amy Haimerl

Amy Haimerl, author of Detroit Hustle:  A Memoir of Love, Life, and Home

My bread and butter is covering small business in the country’s greatest city for innovation, entrepreneurship, and community building. I come prepared with my own pair of Carhartt bibs, every grease stain earned in service to my father’s small excavating company.

I also know a fair amount about urban renewal and rural poverty.

I am currently an adjunct professor of journalism at Michigan State University, but I once bled blue as a Knight-Wallace Fellow, class of ’13, at the University of Michigan. I am an alum of Crain’s Detroit Business, CNNMoneyFortune Small BusinessWestword, and USAA, where I helped military families make smarter choices about their money. I also have a background in enterprise and investigative reporting.

Registration deadline: November 9, 2020

This Zoom session is planned to last 1 hour.

You will be sent the Zoom link in the registration confirmation.

Virtual Author Series with Rachel Gladstone


Rachel Gladstone, author of The Weekend Wedding Assistant, a romantic comedy about death and second chances. 

Rachel started her career as a bohemian backpacker who hiked across Europe and ended up singing backup for Arlo Guthrie and David Bromberg and eventually brought her musical and songwriting talents to Nashville.  Taking Music City to her heart, she wrote songs with leading artists such as Rosie Flores and landed her own acclaimed “All Booked Up” book review column for the international online magazine Dishmag.com.  Her previous writings have appeared in the Nashville Scene, Nashville Lifestyles magazine Ourselves, Foundations, and GX

Rachel will share with us the twists and turns in her life that culminated in her writing a novel.  She’ll discuss how the characters popped in her head and her writing and editing process.  She will also share a reading and we will have time for Q&A at the end. 

“Rachel Gladstone’s sad, funny, redemptive story will strike a chord with anyone who’s loved and lost and gotten back up on their feet again.  This is a blueprint-wise and knowing-for recovery and renewal.  Brava!”

~ Ken Burns, Filmmaker

“Rachel Gladstone’s The Weekend Wedding Assistant” is a fast-moving and highly entertaining story about death, love, passion, and the sorrows and hopes that living brings.  Wonderful, exuberant, real.  A great weekend read!  I am looking forward to a film adaptation!

 ~ Lucinda Williams, Grammy Award Winning Artist

Registration deadline: November 2, 2020

This Zoom session is planned to last 1 hour.

You will be sent the Zoom link in the registration confirmation.

The ABC’s of Q & A


Thinking Like a Journalist to Tell Your Community’s Story

Jeff Milo has been working in libraries since he was a teenager. His degree is in Journalism from the MSU School of Communication and Media, and for the last 16 years, he’s been a reporter-at-large for several publications including the Detroit Free Press, Paste Magazine, the Ann Arbor Current, the Detroit Metro Times, and on-air for WDET. Since 2010, he has been a Circulation Specialist for the Ferndale Area District Library, where his responsibilities have expanded into social media content production, program coordinating–including live music, and leading the library’s Art & Exhibition Committee. At the end of 2019, he started hosting and producing episodes for the library’s new podcast, “A Little Too Quiet”. 

Registration deadline: October 12, 2020

This Zoom sessions is planned to last 1 hour.

You will be sent the Zoom link in the registration confirmation.

“Ask the Attorney” with Anne Seurynck

 

Attorney Anne Seurynck of Foster Swift Collins & Smith PC answers your library-related legal questions. 

A graduate of the University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin Law School, Anne has extensive experience in drafting and reviewing ordinances and policies, serving as general counsel, counseling clients on Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Open Meetings Act issues, and working with communities on millage and Michigan Campaign Finance Issues. Anne also has an expertise in library law which we know about due to her connection to the Library of Michigan and the COVID inspired Director Meeting Fridays. 

 
Questions should be submitted to kvanauken@wplc.org by Friday, October 2. 

Registration deadline: October 5, 2020

This Zoom session is planned for 1 to 1.5 hours depending on questions/answer time.

You will be sent the Zoom link with your registration confirmation.

Rural Libraries and Digital Inclusion: A Tale from a Small Town in Texas


Dianne Connery is the Library Director of the innovative Pottsboro Area Library in Pottsboro, Texas, a community 80 miles north of Dallas with a population of 2,300 people.  Dianne was a corporate trainer and entrepreneur before moving to this rural community ten years ago. On the verge of closing its doors, she led a group of dedicated volunteers who transformed this library into the vibrant community hub it is today. She is passionate about the role of rural libraries and a huge proponent of digital inclusion.  Dianne will share some of the programs she has initiated, like esports competitive gaming, and how she is getting WIFI to places in need in her community. 

Registration deadline: October 19, 2020

Each Zoom session should last about 1 hour

You will be sent the Zoom link in the registration confirmation.

Annual Meeting 2019

Archives of Michigan, Kris Rzepczynski, Senior Archivist
Kris Rzepczynski is a senior archivist at the Archives of Michigan, where he specializes in family history and Michigan research. Rzepczynski has worked in the genealogical community for nearly 20 years. He holds a Master of Library and Information Science degree from Wayne State University and a Master of Arts degree in history from Western Michigan University. He is a former vice president of membership for the Federation of Genealogical Societies and a former president of the Mid-Michigan Genealogical Society.

Space Planning, Fred Schutmaat, Team Schutmaat, Inc.
Fred will focus his first session on the best use of space and talk about the different library areas (Children’s, YA, Reading, browsing, collaborative, quiet, admin, backroom, etc. ).  Size, the configuration of furniture, and shelving components will also come into play.   The second session will focus on locally available products and services that will best fit the library’s needs.  Budget consciousness will be a major part of this session. 

Making the Best of a Bad Board Situation, Clare Membiela, Library of Michigan
Clare will share helpful tips and ideas when it comes to working through difficult board situations.

Michigan Mayhem, Tom Carr
Author Tom Carr tells stories of murder, robbery, and mayhem through the ages in the Great Lakes state. Delivered in a lively manner with irreverence and historical context, the stories include crimes of passion, greed, insanity and just plain awfulness. Carr is the author of MI BAD: Robbers, Cutthroats and Thieves in Michigan’s Past and Present, the second book in the Michigan Mayhem series published by Mission Point Press.  Since his first book,  Blood on the Mitten, was released in 2016, he has told stories of true crimes in all corners of both peninsulas, in print and in person.

Registration deadline: October 4, 2019

Annual Meeting Agenda

 

 

Annual Meeting 2018

Eric Guthrie, State Demographer, will speak on changing population trends in Michigan, especially rural communities. 

Collaborators for the Future: Values, Trends, and Our Changing World

How do we think about the future? As something for someone else to worry about? As something that will happen to us, not with us? Over the past three years, ALA’s Center for the Future of Libraries has learned that thinking about the future starts when we activate our minds to look for signals and trends outside of our immediate environments – and then think about those trends in light of our professional values and the values we seek to provide to our communities. Attendees will take some of the trend scanning from the Center for the Future of Libraries – as well as their own community insights and evidence – and consider positive innovations for the futures of their own libraries.

Megan Murray Cusick, Grassroots Specialist
Office for Library Advocacy
American Library Association

Conservation officer John Borkovich, author of “Wildlife 911“will speak.

Registration deadline: October 4, 2018

Good to Great: Becoming High Achieving Trustees

 

Discription

Shirley Bruursema, Trustee Kent District Library, will review the new Trustee Manual from the Library of Michigan.

Larry Neal, Director Clinton Macomb District Library, will outline roles for directors and trustees.

Please join Shirley and Larry along with other trustees from the White Pine Library Cooperative area to discuss why your “job” is important and other various topics of interest.

Shirley and Larry are well known presenters across Michigan and Nationally for library administration, board training and millage campaigns.

Annual Meeting 2017

James LaRue

An overview of trends in intellectual freedom, and updates on a couple of our recent office initiatives. This would include running occasionally controversial civic engagement programs – where some part of the community gets upset and wants to disinvite a speaker, for instance.

An overview on “getting ready” for challenges (which policies you should have), to responding to the challenge in the moment (particularly for front line staff), to follow-up (a reconsideration process, office support if you need it).

An introduction to library privacy issues, a growing issue.

Mary Kelly and Holly Hibner through pictures and discussion show how to decide which books to keep in your library.

Author, Illustrator Matt Faulkner will speak. His books will be available for purchase and signing.

View the AGENDA for further details.