Library of Michigan CARES Act grants – application

The Library of Michigan (LM) is pleased to announce CARES Act grant program as part of LM’s response to the COVID-19 crisis’ impact on Michigan public libraries. The LM grant program is designed to assist public libraries in providing improved access to the Internet for their community, while maintaining a safe environment for staff and patrons. The intent is to fund one-year projects that increase public libraries’ supply of personal protective equipment and facilities supplies (Goal 1) as well as increase community Internet connectivity through the purchase of Internet capable devices, hotspots or other appropriate materials and supplies (Goal 2).

The application due date is four weeks after the EO closing libraries to public accommodation is lifted to give libraries time to get back in their buildings and assess their needs.

Applicants may request materials and supplies, and services related to either or both the grant program goals. Eligible applicants are Michigan public libraries or tribal libraries who meet the guidelines listed in the application packet. Libraries may submit one application for this program. Branch libraries may NOT apply separately.

The number and amount of grant awards will depend on the funds available and the number of applications received. For the CARES Act Grant, the grant awards will be as follows:

Goal 1 – For PPE equipment and facilities supplies and services:

All eligible requests for Goal 1 will be funded.

Goal 2 – For digital inclusion supplies and services:

  • Up to $5,000 for Class V & VI libraries
  • Up to $3,000 for Class III & IV libraries
  • Up to $1,000 for Class I & II libraries

Libraries in communities with high rates of unemployment and poverty and low rates of Broadband access will have priority for Goal 2. LM has data on these three issues and will rank applications based on these. LM will fund as many of the Goal 2 applications as possible.

The grant period will be 12 months, starting from the date of the contract up to 9/30/2021. For full information on the grant program, including the application, please go to www.michigan.gov/lsta and go to the CARES Act grant section. We encourage you to read the grant documentation thoroughly. Grant funds cannot be used to reimburse libraries for purchases made before the grant contract start date.

Question can be directed to

Karren Reish
Library Grants Coordinator
517-241-0021
www.michigan.gov/lsta
www.michigan.gov/sl21

RIDES & MeLCat Quarantine and Cleaning Guidelines

Materials delivered to your building will need some special attention for the protection of both library staff and courier staff.

These guidelines are based on CDC recommendations, and may change if those recommendations change.

Quarantine/cleaning guidelines

  • Materials –
    • Quarantine books for 24-72 hours.
      • 24 hours for paper/cardboard covers
      • 72 hours for mylar plastic covers & CD/DVD cases
    • Do not use direct cleaning products unless there is visible evidence of contamination.
    • Do not use liquid disinfectants or cleaning products on items belonging to another library.
    • UV ray exposure as a means of sterilization is harmful to materials  and is not recommended.
    • Quarantine packaging materials a minimum of 24 hours before reusing.

Question or concerns can be directed to

Sue Alt
MeLCat Support and Delivery Coordinator
Midwest Collaborative for Library Services (MCLS)
800-530-9019 ext 143

Michigan Public Libraries: Re-opening Considerations after closures during the Covid-19 Pandemic


The Michigan Cooperative Association developed a document to list considerations for libraries in Michigan when re-opening their buildings to the public.

Intent, Scope and Purpose of this document:

Intent–to identify areas of concern that member libraries may need to address when determining temporary procedures upon reopening to the public.

Scope–to consider what type and level of measures would be needed to protect the staff and the public.

Purpose–to generate a list of possible issues that a reasonable person would generally find to be of concern in the current COVID-19 work environment. The list shall be representative in nature only and is not meant to be exhaustive; the administrators of member libraries are encouraged to consult with the director of their county health department and legal counsel for further information on requirements.

View the document here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vS0R2LToMYT0LF1bdzSEIJqhJfYtwR-W9D80Z90gzbPJICsa479GY6sUmpiQUxcGaLvQsy6QjWqZv6O/pub

Looking Ahead, Planning for Reopening Webinar

Friday, April 24, 1:00 p.m. central (2:00 pm Eastern)

Even as many are working overtime to provide remote and adapted services to their communities, librarians, library staff and boards are planning for reopening when it becomes safe to do so. There are many considerations, from patron and staff safety to dealing with materials, equipment, and space; from bringing staff onsite to restarting programs. Has your state established a task force or working group to launch the planning process? Join a conversation with colleagues from states across the country, share information, ask questions, hear what resources are available and let ALA know what help you need. Please register here.

This conversation is being convened by ALA’s Public Policy and Advocacy Office and the Chapter Relations Office.

Megan Murray Cusick, MLIS
Assistant Director, State Advocacy
American Library Association
mcusick@ala.org

Free & Open Sourced PDF books for children’s mental health


COVID19 Books for Children from Children’s Advocacy Centers of Michigan (4 titles).

When Everything Opens – a response story and distance Learning during COVID-19  – FREE registration and download from Teachers Pay Teachers.

Coronavirus: A Book for Children by Elizabeth Jenner, Kate Wilson & Nia Roberts, illustrated by Axel Scheffler.

Resources & Activities

Developmental Trauma, Children and Family Mental Health, and more resources from Beacon House Therapeutic Services (UK).

ACES Too High Resources on adverse childhood experiences.

Managing COVID-19 Anxiety (all ages) from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, including

My Pandemic Story: A Guided Activity Workbook for the World’s Children, Families, Teachers, and Caregivers from The Children’s Psychological Health Center.

COVID-19 Time Capsule from Loving Creations.

Barefoot Books At-Home Activity Books include “Managing Anxiety “and “Mindfulness for All Ages.”

Tech Tips

Families & Tech During COVID-19 from Navigating Screens Project (LSTA).

Resources for Families During the Coronavirus Pandemic from Common Sense Media.

Provided by Cathy Lancaster, Youth Services Coordinator, Library of Michigan


COVID-19 Resources



Governor Whitmer Extends, Expands “Stay Home, Stay Safe” Executive Order to Save Lives

Governor directs all Michiganders to stay home, stay safe through April 30 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
April 9, 2020

LANSING, Mich. — Today, Governor Whitmer signed executive order 2020-42, extending her prior “Stay Home, Stay Safe” order through the end of April. As with the prior order, Executive Order 2020-42 limits gatherings and travel and requires all workers who are not necessary to sustain or protect life to stay home. Executive Order 2020-42 also imposes more stringent limitations on stores to reduce foot traffic, slow the spread of the coronavirus, and save lives.

“Michigan has the third highest number of COVID-19 cases in the country, and we’re still on the upswing. We must continue to do everything we can to slow the spread and protect our families,” said Governor Whitmer. “Data shows that most Michiganders are doing their part by staying home and staying safe. That’s good, but we must keep it up. When we do, we can save lives and shorten the amount of time we’re working through this crisis, which will be good for our families and good for our economy in the long-run. We can also protect critical infrastructure workers like doctors, nurses, grocery store employees, and child care workers. Now more than ever, it’s crucial that people stay home and stay safe.” 

“It’s clear that staying home is the most effective way we can slow the spread of COVID-19 in Michigan,” said Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Chief Deputy for Health and Chief Medical Executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun. “This aggressive action will help us protect more people and ease the strain on our health care system.” 

Executive Order 2020-42 prohibits all businesses and operations from requiring workers to leave their homes, unless those workers are necessary to sustain or protect life or to conduct minimum basic operations. Businesses and operations are to designate the workers who meet those criteria, and must adopt social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons in the performance of that in-person work.  

Workers who are necessary to sustain or protect life include those in health care and public health, law enforcement and public safety, grocery store workers, and more. For a full list of these critical infrastructure workers, click the link to Executive Order 2020-42 at the bottom of this page. To enable these critical workers to get to their workplaces, automobile dealerships will now be allowed to open for remote sales, though showrooms must remain closed. 

Under the new order, all public and private gatherings among persons outside a single household remain temporarily prohibited. Though Michiganders may leave the house to get groceries or needed supplies, the new order encourages people to limit the number of household members running errands to the maximum extent possible. As before, people may engage in outdoor activities like walking, hiking, running, cycling, kayaking, canoeing, or any other recreational activity, consistent with remaining at least six feet from people from outside a person’s household and with other restrictions imposed by prior executive orders. The order clarifies, however, that travel for vacations or for any other purpose is prohibited. 

A new section of the order imposes restrictions on stores in an effort to reduce crowds. Large stores must limit the number of people in the store at one time to no more than 4 customers for every 1,000 square feet of customer floor space; small stores must limit capacity to 25% of the total occupancy limits (including employees) under the fire codes. To regulate entry, stores must establish lines with markings for patrons to enable them to stand at least six feet apart from one another while waiting. Large stores must also close areas of the store that are dedicated to carpeting, flooring, furniture, garden centers, plant nurseries, or paint. 

“This doesn’t mean everything will go back to normal on May 1,” Gov. Whitmer continued. “But based on the data we have right now, this is the appropriate window for an extension. It will take time to safely and responsibly re-open the economy, which is why we will continue to provide critical unemployment support and assistance to our small businesses during this challenging time. We will get through this if we all continue to do our part.” 

All individuals who leave their home or place of residence must adhere to social distancing measures recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household. 

To view Executive Order 2020-42, click the link below: 

Closures extended until April 13, 2020

Gov. Whitmer’s Executive Order 2020-20 has extended the closure of libraries (and other entities) until April 13, 2020 at 11:59 pm.

Acting under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, I order the following:

  1. Beginning as soon as possible but no later than March 22, 2020 at 9:00 am, and continuing until April 13, 2020 at 11:59 pm, the following places of public accommodation are closed to ingress, egress, use, and occupancy by members of the public:
  2. Restaurants, food courts, cafes, coffeehouses, and other places of public accommodation offering food or beverage for on-premises consumption;
  3. Bars, taverns, brew pubs, breweries, microbreweries, distilleries, wineries, tasting rooms, special licensees, clubs, and other places of public accommodation offering alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption;
  4. Hookah bars, cigar bars, and vaping lounges offering their products for on-premises consumption;
  5. Theaters, cinemas, and indoor and outdoor performance venues;
  6. Libraries and museums;
  7. Gymnasiums, fitness centers, recreation centers, indoor sports facilities, indoor exercise facilities, exercise studios, and facilities offering non-essential personal care services;
  8. Casinos licensed by the Michigan Gaming Control Board, racetracks licensed by the Michigan Gaming Control Board, and Millionaire Parties licensed by the Michigan Gaming Control Board; and
  9. Places of public amusement not otherwise listed above.

Here’s a link to the order:

https://www.michigan.gov/whitmer/0,9309,7-387-90499_90705-522576–,00.html?fbclid=IwAR3rKgQJNq69_rCM8I5vXa-FWrKHTZtE4Nzsm10q9LAoDIFRPRZfbUbCgKo